Nonfiction

PERSONAL ESSAYS

Accidental Adulthood (Thought Catalog)

On a winter night in New York six years ago, two friends and I were in the back of a cab, heading from one bar to another, when our conversation was interrupted by a loud thump.

Seduced by Confession (Freerange Nonfiction)

Some people claim their need to love is greater than their need to be loved. My overabundance of the former has always made the latter more of a necessity.

Seduction Therapy (The Atlantic)

The truth is, I never considered my relationship with Clarice as it pertained to my past relationships, the similarities and the differences, the positives and the negatives, until I first met with Dr. Phillips roughly eight months after that night at the bar.

Brooklyn, Borough of Snobs (New York Daily News)

What could have caused the residents of Brooklyn to remove the chips from their shoulders, ready to fling them at anyone who dared trespass into their borough?

Why They Haven’t Occupied Mississippi (New York Daily News)

The part of me from New York understands the issue of Initiative 26; the part of me from Mississippi does not understand the issue of Occupy Wall Street.

Sex Lives of the Saints (The Morning News)

In Lives of the Saints, set in New Orleans during the Reagan era, the narrator, Louise, hides her love for Claude Collier, my novelistic analog, beneath the guise of mere friendship.

A Rifle Named Waylon (The Atlantic)

Something in my heart has always been recklessly attracted to people who are reckless with my heart.

Wing Women of the Redneck Riviera (Thought Catalog)

If I didn’t understand or appreciate the female mindset enough to be friends with a woman, how could I ever hope to cajole, beg, or delude one into sleeping with me?

Four’s a Crowd (Thought Catalog)

Across the bed, Tatum, who I had been dating for three months and for whom I was still uncertain about my feelings, looked stunningly beautiful. I could not take my eyes off her. That inability became a problem when, seconds later, she began to make out with the other girl.

Grand Gestures (The Good Men Project)

Baseball statistics rushed through my head, but unfortunately, I knew very few baseball statistics. Suddenly it happened.

How to Go on a Road Trip (Thought Catalog)

On Easter weekend of your freshman year at Dartmouth, you and two friends, Rick and John, decide to rent a car and drive to New Haven, CT, where you once attended a summer program for high school students.

Young, Male, Straight — and Anorexic (Salon)

My teachers considered it a harmless loss of baby fat. My parents shrugged it off as a symptom of puberty. As I crossed into double digits, however, people began to whisper. I appeared to be wasting away, the victim of some terminal Victorian disease, the poetic and tragic mystique of which pleased my future writer’s self.

Panic Attacks and Other Cures for Heartbreak (Nerve)

Sweat trickled down my spine, leaving my shirt a damp mess. The room slowly began to whirl. The air suddenly became thick. Rigor mortis overtook my hands, turning them into claws.

Dirty Rush (The Good Men Project)

I chose to go through pledge term because, despite its moments of agony, the experience overall was a grand old time. It was funny and it was foolish and it was stupid and it was silly. Youth and college and life are funny and foolish, and youth and college and life are stupid and silly. That is what makes it worthwhile to be young and alive in college.

Based on a True Story (Thought Catalog)

My entire life I had been told never talk to strangers.

The Great Johnny Depp Heist (The Good Men Project)

On top of a cocktail napkin I wrote, “Mission Objective: Kidnap Johnny Depp,” under which I drew a rudimentary outline of five city blocks.

Updike for Beginners (Thought Catalog)

“This is you,” she quoted from a moment of internal monologue, the protagonist thinking of what he would like to say. “This is perfect.”

Lying My Way to Love (Nerve)

For years Jocelyn had been my partner in deceit. Despite the on-again, off-again nature of our relationship, she and I, whenever we veered to the more-than-friends side of the spectrum, always turned our courtship into the stuff of legend. 

The Last Days of Maury the Lobster (Nerve)

At that moment, looking at the girl next to me, I thought with absolute certainty she was blind.

Accidents Will Happen (Nerve)

We had drunk hot cider and bourbon at an underground bar, traded shirts in a bathroom with no mirrors, driven home by stick-shifting on icy roads, and woken her roommates with our attempts at one more time.

BOOK-RELATED WORK

The Barbarian Princess (Deep South Magazine)

  • Essay on author Florence King

The Fictional Gordon Lish (Passages North)

  • Essay on Gordon Lish and two novels that feature characters based on him

Layman’s Report by Eugene Marten (The Rumpus)

  • Review

We the Narrators (The Millions)

  • Essay on the first-person-plural POV

Barry Hannah’s “Lost Novel” (The Millions)

  • Essay on Nightwatchmen by Barry Hannah

The Last Book I Loved (The Rumpus)

  • Review of Smonk by Tom Franklin

Exiles of Historical Fiction (The Millions)

  • Review of Exiles by Ron Hansen

The Last Book I Loved (The Rumpus)

  • Review of Firework by Eugene Marten

Big Brother Gets a Laptop (Esquire)

  • Review of The Unbinding by Walter Kirn

Read, Ponder, Repeat (Esquire)

  • Review of Remainder by Tom McCarthy

You’ve Got to Hear This! (Esquire)

  • Review of You Don’t Love Me Yet by Jonathan Lethem

What’s That Sound? (Esquire)

  • Review of Lost Echoes by Joe R. Lansdale